What Is Another Way to Say “Cancel Out”?

Looking for synonyms for cancel out? We’ve got you covered!

Here’s a list of other ways to say cancel out.

  • Neutralize
  • Offset
  • Nullify
  • Counteract
  • Negate
  • Annul
  • Invalidate
  • Counterbalance
  • Void
  • Erase
  • Balance
  • Abolish
  • Counterpoise
  • Compensate for
  • Obviate
  • Repeal
  • Rescind
  • Eliminate
  • Counter
  • Undo

Want to learn how to say cancel out professionally? Keep reading for examples and use cases.

1. Neutralize

When to Use: Suitable for making something ineffective or harmless.
Example: “The new policy was introduced to neutralize the risks associated with cyber attacks.”

2. Offset

When to Use: Appropriate for counterbalancing or compensating.
Example: “The company plans to plant trees to offset its carbon emissions.”

3. Nullify

When to Use: Best used for making something legally null and void.
Example: “The court decision served to nullify the previous agreement.”

4. Counteract

When to Use: Suitable for acting against something in order to reduce its force or neutralize it.
Example: “The medication is given to counteract the symptoms.”

5. Negate

When to Use: Appropriate for making something ineffective or invalid.
Example: “This error could negate all our previous efforts.”

6. Annul

When to Use: Best used for declaring invalid (an official agreement, decision, or result).
Example: “The contract was annulled due to the breach of terms.”

7. Invalidate

When to Use: Suitable for making something no longer valid.
Example: “The new evidence could invalidate the test results.”

8. Counterbalance

When to Use: Appropriate for balancing or offsetting the effect of something.
Example: “Increased exercise can counterbalance a high-calorie diet.”

9. Void

When to Use: Best used for declaring something to be not valid or legally void.
Example: “The clause was declared void due to unfair terms.”

10. Erase

When to Use: Suitable for removing or eliminating something completely.
Example: “The new software update will erase the previous glitches.”

11. Balance

When to Use: Appropriate for bringing something into a state of equilibrium.
Example: “Work-life balance is important for employee well-being.”

12. Abolish

When to Use: Best used for formally putting an end to a system, practice, or institution.
Example: “The company abolished the old performance review system.”

13. Counterpoise

When to Use: Suitable for balancing by opposition or contrasting effect.
Example: “Their strategic plan serves as a counterpoise to market volatility.”

14. Compensate for

When to Use: Appropriate for making up for something unwelcome or unpleasant by exerting an opposite force or effect.
Example: “The firm must introduce measures to compensate for its environmental impact.”

15. Obviate

When to Use: Best used for removing a need or difficulty.
Example: “The new system obviates the need for manual data entry.”

16. Repeal

When to Use: Suitable for revoking or annulling a law or congressional act.
Example: “The government decided to repeal the outdated legislation.”

17. Rescind

When to Use: Appropriate for revoking, canceling, or repealing a law, order, or agreement.
Example: “The company rescinded its decision to downsize the department.”

18. Eliminate

When to Use: Best used for completely removing or getting rid of something.
Example: “The new initiative aims to eliminate inefficiencies in the workflow.”

19. Counter

When to Use: Suitable for opposing or responding to something.
Example: “The new policy counters the challenges posed by remote work arrangements.”

20. Undo

When to Use: Appropriate for reversing the effects or results of a previous action or decision.
Example: “The software update will undo the changes made in the last version.”

Linda Brown